Category Archives: United Nations

LanguageTime Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers

Interpreters Guide 2

The Language Time Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers in the United States Government, United Nations and European Commission is now available.  If you have not sent your email previously to receive your complimentary copy, you may do so by clicking —–>here

Those that have previously filled out the request form will be received the PDF copy of the Guide shortly.

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LanguageTime Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers now available

Interpreters Guide 2

The Language Time Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers in the United States Government, United Nations and European Commission is now available.  If you have not sent your email previously to receive your complimentary copy, you may do so by clicking —–>here

Those that have previously filled out the request form will be received the PDF copy of the Guide shortly.

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How to Become a United Nations #Interpreter –via ehow Money

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United Nations interpreters have an exciting job combining international relations with foreign language skills and diplomacy. Becoming one of the few United Nations interpreters requires advanced language skills and plenty of training. While you may not experience the international espionage and intrigue Nicole Kidman did in the movie “The Interpreter,” you’ll still have a front-row view of global affairs as they happen. Here is how to do it.

United Nations interpreters have an exciting job combining international relations with foreign language skills and diplomacy. Becoming one of the few United Nations interpreters requires advanced language skills and plenty of training. While you may not experience the international espionage and intrigue Nicole Kidman did in the movie “The Interpreter,” you’ll still have a front-row view of global affairs as they happen. Here is how to do it.

To read more of this article courtesy of ehow money, click the link below.

http://www.ehow.com/how_2120963_become-united-nations-interpreter.html

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Profile of a United Nations #interpreter –via U.N. website

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I first became interested in the United Nations back in the early 1970s. At that time, China was going through a period of change, and I wanted to be a part of its transition and immersion into the international community.

I joined the United Nations as an interpreter to be a part of the international dialogue between countries as they come together and discuss issues that impact the whole World. It is such a great responsibility. For an interpreter, these are called “missions”. I love working these missions, although at times they can become demanding. I have voluntarily worked 9-week sessions before, which required back-to-back missions. On occasions, there were so many missions that I often times lost count! My wife calls me a “work horse”, which is funny because I was born under the Chinese zodiac sign of the Horse.

Working as an interpreter is a challenge for many reasons. As an interpreter it is my job to allow the speaker to speak at his own pace to deliver his message. Furthermore, it is imperative that I convey that message quickly so that the audience understands the importance of the message. It requires mental agility and perseverance; an interpreter must be able to shift gears from one tongue to another, mindful of all of the cultural and colloquial nuances associated with the language. At times, the language gap can be immense, but a good interpreter bridges this gap fluidly. The biggest challenge to interpreting in the United Nations is not just conveying the message, but conveying the passion that goes along with it. I remember the adrenaline rush I felt when translating for Dr. Klaus Topfer, former Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme; in 1998 he gave a speech with such passion and conviction that I felt such pride translating his message to the audience. His words, “I have the responsibility for UNEP. We must be accountable for our actions or inactions in a world where there is plenty to do and we have resources to do it.” These words deserve to be shared with the world.

To see more about getting a career at the United Nations click —–> here.

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FEATURE: Juggling a cacophony of tongues, UN interpreters avert linguistic disaster — via UN News Centre

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Highly skilled interpreters perform a vital service at UN meetings, where delegates come together to present their views in one of the six official languages or in their own tongue. A UN Interpreter, at work in a booth over looking a meeting room. (1965) UN Photo

18 October 2013 – Out of potential linguistic chaos, a corps of over 100 United Nations interpreters brings order and comprehension as speaker after speaker from around the planet takes the podium of the General Assembly to give their annual speeches at the General Debate, discusses war and peace in the Security Council, or delves into arcane details of administrative and budgetary affairs in one of the Assembly’s six specialized committees.

UN interpreters have even inspired Hollywood: the linguistic specialists were featured in a 2005 political thriller starring Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn. The Interpreter, the first movie to be shot inside UN Headquarters in New York, was directed by the late Sydney Pollack, who said at the time: “You have tons and tons of visitors but most of the people…don’t know what the UN looks like and don’t understand how the UN works and don’t know what its day-to-day business is.”

Despite all the possibilities for “lost in translation” moments, the UN Interpretation Service runs remarkably smoothly. “We’ve never caused a problem, a slip of the tongue here, a slip of the tongue there, perhaps,” Interpretation Service Chief Hossam Fahr told the UN News Centre in an interview.

But this does not mean the team has not at times found itself inadvertently embroiled in burning disputes, compounded by the speed at which some delegates speak, such as the issue of the name of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM).

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A UN-brokered accord in 1995 between FYROM and Greece committed the two countries to negotiate on the name issue under UN auspices, with the republic to be referred to provisionally as the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, pending a final solution. The accord obliges both Athens and Skopje to continue negotiations under the auspices of the Secretary-General to try to reach an agreement.

To read more of this article click the link below.

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=46287&Cr=scenes&Cr1=#.Umpy-7jD_IU

 

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