Category Archives: Military

LanguageTime Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers

Interpreters Guide 2

The Language Time Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers in the United States Government, United Nations and European Commission is now available.  If you have not sent your email previously to receive your complimentary copy, you may do so by clicking —–>here

Those that have previously filled out the request form will be received the PDF copy of the Guide shortly.

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LanguageTime Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers now available

Interpreters Guide 2

The Language Time Annual Guide for Interpreter Careers in the United States Government, United Nations and European Commission is now available.  If you have not sent your email previously to receive your complimentary copy, you may do so by clicking —–>here

Those that have previously filled out the request form will be received the PDF copy of the Guide shortly.

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Tongue tied in Afghanistan –via PBS Newshour

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Sardar Khan cradles his infant son in one arm as he considers a thick stack of his life’s most important documents on a glass table before him. The documents include medical records, letters of recommendation from U.S. military officers and five passports–one for Khan and each member of his family.

Khan is 26, an Afghan native, and has spent seven years working as a translator for the U.S. Army. He is proud of his work, but fears that it has put him and his children in danger. And the visa program designed to help Afghans like him escape such danger, he says, has done little to secure his safety.

I am living in a village where everybody knows me … who I am, who I am working for, where my house is, these things,” Khan says. “They are just waiting for a small chance, like if the security gets a little bit worse. I am really concerned about my babies especially. I love them more than my life.”

Khan says he applied for a U.S. visa in 2012, under a program designed to help Afghans like him escape the country. He had an interview with the U.S. Embassy in early 2013 and has been waiting for an answer ever since. The process has left him emotionally and financially drained.

“We did this much paperwork to…get an interview scheduled,” he says, holding the documents aloft.

“It cost me around $5,000 U.S. that I spent for a better future.”

To read more of this article courtesy of PBS Newshour, click the link below.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/tongue-tied-afghanistan/

 

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U.S. visa backlog leaves Afghan interpreters in limbo –via Seattle Times

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Thousands of Afghans who have served as U.S. military interpreters and who now fear for their lives are waiting in limbo to hear about their applications to move to the U.S. Though Congress authorized 8,750 visas for Afghan interpreters, only 1,982 had been issued through Dec. 10.

By David Zucchino

Los Angeles Times

KABUL, Afghanistan — Before serving as an interpreter for the U.S. military, Shafiq Nazari passed exhaustive background checks by U.S. military and intelligence agencies.

The military trusted him enough to issue him an automatic rifle. He has fired it during several firefights with insurgents, fighting shoulder to shoulder with U.S. soldiers and Marines on about 200 combat missions in Afghanist5an.

Nazari, 38, a compact man with short-cropped hair and a trim black beard, has been issued a badge that gives him free run of a high-security U.S. base in downtown Kabul, where he translates for U.S. military advisers. He has 70 letters of recommendation from American officers, including two generals, praising his loyalty and courage under fire.

But none of that has been enough to persuade the U.S. State Department to grant a visa to Nazari under a program for Afghan interpreters whose lives are in danger because of their service to the United States. Nazari says he has been waiting nearly five years for approval of his application for a Special Immigrant Visa, or SIV.

With the looming withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan, thousands of Afghans who have served as military interpreters are in limbo as the State Department works to clear a backlog of SIV applications. Congress had authorized 8,750 visas for Afghan interpreters, but only 1,982 have been issued through Dec. 10.

To read more of this article courtesy of The Seattle Times, click the link below.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2022861165_afhgansvisawaitxml.html

 

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DARPA Experts Break Language Barriers With Technology –via U.S. Department of Defense

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DARPA Experts Break Language Barriers With Technology

By Amaani Lyle
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Jan. 9, 2014 – Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency scientists will build on language processing technologies with improved speed and accuracy –- offering an advantage to analysts in a variety of military and non-military scenarios, a program manager said today at the DARPA Congressional Tech Showcase here.

Dr. Bonnie Dorr, DARPA Human Language Technologies, demonstrated Raytheon BBN Technologies’ “Byblos,” one of several speech recognition systems that represent the state of the art in trainable, large-vocabulary, speaker-independent speech recognition.

“What’s of interest here is gleaning information from the huge volumes that come through to us in foreign languages,” Dorr said. “So it’s really [addressing] the big data problem.”

he natural language processing technologies can locate, identify, and organize information from a variety of sources and in at least 15 languages.

English-speaking analysts once saddled with sifting through a barrage of information in foreign languages can now use real-time filters to pinpoint information in audio and video broadcasts.

“The system goes into the video, pulls out the audio, separates it into sentences, renders it as text, and translates it into English so that the human, who speaks only English, can then read what this Arabic broadcast news is about,” Dorr explained.

She added that despite a three-minute delay from a live broadcast, the real-time feed of identifying and aggregating individual pieces of information from raw data is remarkable.

The next chapter, Dorr said, involves developing what the translation output does to enhance information analytics.

“In the future, we want to be able to read through language to meaning because people don’t always explicitly state all the assumptions that are underlying what they’re saying,” she said.

http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=121456

 

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